New Balance 1080v2 General Info

The New Balance 1080v2 is New Balance’s latest offering in the premium neutral category, and aims to provide a cushioned, smooth ride in a lighter-weight package. New Balance incorporated a new material for the sole unit, which allows for a lighter shoe. This update to the 1080 is a full ounce lighter than the previous version, and makes a huge difference in terms of feel. Another key feature of the shoe was the low heel to toe ratio, which encourages a mid-foot strike. Overall, the 1080v2 is a dependable shoe that doesn’t get in the way of your natural foot strike, fantastic for long runs or high-mileage weeks.

New Balance 1080v2 Impressions

I had high expectations for the New Balance 1080v2, and I wasn’t disappointed. With experience in some of their other shoes and having heard a lot about them, I was hoping for a shoe that delivered a smooth ride without all of the bulk or weight to hold me back.

From the very first run, I felt like I had been running in them for years. For me, the best part of the 1080v2 is the fact that I don’t really notice them when I’m running. From the smooth ride to the comfortable upper, they provided cushioning to keep my legs and feet comfortable, without making me feel like I was disconnected from the road beneath me or was forcing my feet to work in an unnatural way.

While I loved the 1080v2 for long runs and recovery runs, they aren’t a great choice for track workouts for me, despite their lower weight. The sole unit is slightly thicker than the shoes that I would typically wear for a track workout, though I didn’t have this issue for tempo runs. For me, this one drawback isn’t a huge disadvantage, as I tend to alternate my shoes for each workout, and have a dedicated pair for the track.

New Balance 1080v2 Sole Unit

New Balance made some significant updates to the 1080v2, starting first with the material used for the cushioning in the sole. The 1080v2 is the first shoe to use New Balance’s new N2 technology in the heel. N2 technology is a foam that has been injected with nitrogen, which allows for additional durability and also makes it possible to use less material without losing cushioning.

Long time New Balance fans can rest assured, however, as the rest of the sole uses many of the same materials found in their other offerings, so the overall feel of the shoe isn’t a huge departure. For additional support, New Balance has also included a T-beam shank in the midfoot, which provides some stability without making for a rigid, inflexible sole. Overall, the sole unit is soft and supportive, and stood up well to the elements.

Another key feature of the sole unit is the heel to toe ratio, which is just 8 millimeters. This lower ration encourages a midfoot strike, and makes these shoes a great option for those looking to work on their form or natural midfoot strikers.

New Balance 1080v2 Upper Unit

The upper unit of the 1080v2 is all about comfort and balance. Like other new shoes on the market, the 1080v2 features details like laser etching and no-sew application of the details on the shoe. These techniques allow for a slightly lighter weight and also make for a smoother feel, which cuts down on blistering.

The upper has a nice, snug fit, without being overly narrow, so they would be a great fit on a variety of runners. They also feature excellent arch support, which just adds to the overall comfort of the shoe.

New Balance 1080v2 Opinion

The New Balance 1080v2 is a great long-run shoe. Though they lacked that “fast” feeling that comes from some shoes, they are a solid choice that doesn’t get in the way of your run or natural foot strike. I also loved the low heel to toe ratio, which encouraged a mid-foot strike.