Buying Guides   Top 5 Cushioning Running Shoes: 2012

Top 5 Cushioning Running Shoes: 2012

 January 08, 2013 11
Top 5 Cushioning Running Shoes: 2012

After quite a few months of running, and many many miles, we take a look at some of the best cushioning running shoes of 2012.

You should be shopping for cushioning running shoes if you are a neutral pronator and you strike the ground with your heel first. You don’t HAVE to look for cushioning running shoes, but in our experience if you are relatively new to running and don’t need extra support (ie for very flexible or flat arches) a cushioned running shoe will ease you into the sport.

Here below you’ll find our selection of 5 remarkable cushioning running shoes. We took into account the amount of cushioning, the general fit, weight and like every selection it is subjective.

 

Nike Zoom Pegasus+ 29

nike pegasus 29 top

nike pegasus 29

Whenever a new runner asks me for advice on a cushioning running shoe, the Nike Pegasus is the first one I recommend. With superb cushioning and a fit that seems to be right for so many runners, we believe the Pegasus is a right point of start. Try it.
Nike Zoom Pegasus 29 review, including PROS/CONS, readers’ votes and price comparison!

Brooks Ghost 5

Brooks Ghost 5 main

Brooks Ghost 5

The Ghost is quite a new shoe compared to some of the others in this article, but it has grown steadily into a big favourite. Lighter than your average cushioned shoe, it seems to be particularly appreciated by female runners for a very comfortable, soft ride.
Brooks Ghost 5 review, including PROS/CONS, readers’ votes and price comparison!

Saucony Kinvara 3

Saucony Kinvara 3 - Heel Detail

Saucony Kinvara 3

Talking about a shoe that took the market with a storm. Saucony launched the Kinvara in 2010 and won the hearts of many, by being an extremely lightweight  and close to the ground shoe, favouring natural motion but still offering good protection from the impacts.
Saucony Kinvara 3 Review, including PROS/CONS, readers’ votes and price comparison!

New Balance 890v2

New Balance 890v2 - Pair

New Balance 890v2

Lightweight and responsive! The NB 890v2 is a shoe for runners who want to run fast and still receive a top class cushioning treatment.
New Balance 890v2 review, including PROS/CONS, readers’ votes and price comparison!

Adidas Adizero F50 v2

Adidas Adizero F50 2 - Upper View

Adidas Adizero F50 2

Adidas launched an amazing number of very good shoes this year. The Boston, the Tempo, the Sequence…. but the F50 v2 is truly great in the way that works very well for everyday training, but at the same time doubles up as a very fast racing shoe.
Adidas Adizero F50 v2 Review, including PROS/CONS, readers’ votes and price comparison!

 

We look forward to hear your feedback! What cushioning running shoe do you wear? Why do you like it? Do you feel we neglected some incredible shoe? The comment section is waiting for you!

Thanks!

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COMMENTS (11)

  • Isn’t the Tempo 5 in the “performance stability” category?

  • Which shoe would you recommend for a runner with narrow feet looking for a substitute for the Nike Skylon? I loved the Skylon for its cushion but still very dynamic feeling.

    • Hi Angelika – I didn’t run in the Skylon at the time, but people I know at Nike told me that the new Zoom Elite is the closest in feel. Good luck!

  • Hi Runners,
    It’s always difficult to qualify a “minimalist” shoe because there are no specific limits associated to this adjective.
    The Running Clinic had the idea to create a formula to rate minimalist shoes!
    Find out about it and get access to the actual formula document by reading our article on our bilingual blog :
    http://www.therunningclinic.ca/blog/2012/09/definition-du-minimalisme-defining-minimalism/

    enjoy!

  • Hello I am 46 years old, 5’8″ tall, around 160 pounds, neutral, and midfoot striker.(My previews shoes were nimbus and glycerin.)
    At this moment I am running with Saucony Ride 5 and Saucony Triumph. why…I like it firm cushioning. I run for health so…, I always look for cushion to avoid any pain or mild injury. I do not know in the future, but I will keep Saucony for a while.
    HELLO from Puerto Rico, THANKS

  • I’m a bit confused, though I doubt (hope) I’m not alone. I am new to running. I tried for a. It last fall and felt so good about myself but I didn’t last long. I am large by running shoe standards at 6’1″ and about 210lbs. So. Clearly I am also wanting to do this for the weight loss as well as o stall health.
    I am certainly a heel striker and have a low, though not totally flat, arch. In reading the low arch article I was set on shoes in the support category. However, reading this and being new and heavy it sounds like cushioning is suggested. I should also add that while I don’t have leg or feet problems, I do have lower back and right hip pain on occasion. Seems to coincide when I have a few lbs to lose. I would love to get to a point of working on form, in particular proper foot strike with the aid of Nike Free’s or the like, but it seems that comes later in the hobby.

    • Hi Josh – it is confusing indeed.

      I admit I also contributed to the confusion, let’s see if I can help. Cushioning refers to the “shock absorption” that a shoe has. Especially in the heels.

      This article talks about “neutral” shoe (to cut it short, for high arches) but we call them “cushioning” because it’s somehow the industry standard.

      This said, you can get a _support_ shoe that has lots of cushioning. For example, have a look at the nike structure triax 15

  • I don’t agree with any of those choices. I really like soft cushioned shoes and try everything at the stores to see which ones feel like running on clouds. So far, the old Nike Vomeros felt the best to me for Nike shoes. I had Brooks, and those felt like running on concrete. Overall, though, best cushioned shoe on the market is the Hoka Bondi B’s. Holy damn, they feel like you’re running on foam padding. There are downsides to this, of course. But, for training, they are the best. You can easily get 400+ good miles out of them. They are expensive, but I usually wait for them to be on clearance on certain sites and buy a whole bunch.

  • I run in and like the Brooks Glycerin (although I’m going to try the Brooks Ghost) but they are expensive. I have 250 run/walk miles on them and they feel like they’re just getting broken in. The DNA cushioning is everything you read about in the reviews – not too soft, not too hard. I’m very happy with this shoe. The Ghost, however, may be a good lower cost substitute.

  • I run in and like the Brooks Glycerin (although I’m going to try the Brooks Ghost) but they are expensive. I have 250 run/walk miles on them and they feel like they’re just getting broken in. The DNA cushioning is everything you read about in the reviews – not too soft, not too hard. I’m very happy with this shoe. The Ghost, however, may be a good lower cost substitute.

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