Saucony Triumph 22 review

8 expert score
0 user's score
As editorial policy, we do not accept free samples. We purchased this pair at Running Warehouse with our own money.
Review written on 27th May by Brandon Law Marathon Runner and Shoe Expert
164 other reviews

Saucony Triumph 22 Verdict

The Saucony Triumph 22 is a good max-cushioned trainer which is best suited to slow, easy runs. It has a wide base which provides a very stable ride and thick, durable rubber on its outsole. Version 22 has a new PEBA midsole but it feels plusher and slower than previous versions making it less versatile.

The pros

  • Excellent stability due to wider base
  • Comfortable upper with no hotspots
  • Plusher ride than its predecessor
  • Very tough, durable outsole

The cons

  • Not as energetic as the other PWRRUN PB models
  • Heavier than the Triumph 21
  • Warm upper

Where to buy

Best offers today in United States, all prices in USD

Rating breakdown

Comfort
9.0
Build quality
9.0
Upper
7.0
Sole unit
8.0
Landing
8.0
Transition
8.0
Toe-off
8.0
Traction
8.0
Durability
9.0
Value / Price
7.0

Facts / Specs

Brand
Model
Triumph 22
Family
Previous model
Weight
10.5 oz (298 g)
MSRP
$160.00

Heel
40 mm.
Toe
30 mm.
Heel drop
10 mm.
Carbon plate
No plate

Size/Fit

Sizing
True to size
Heel fit
Normal
Midfoot fit
Normal
Toebox fit
Normal

Cushioning & ride

Type of cushioning
Balanced/plush
Amount of cushioning
Highly cushioned
Stability
Very stable
Flexibility
Flexible

Usage

Racing
Speedwork
Daily training  
Long distance racing
Ultra distance racing

Who should buy the Saucony Triumph 22 ?

If you like the Saucony Ride 17 but you crave a softer, more cushioned ride, the Triumph 22 is your shoe.
If you found the Triumph 21 too firm and unstable, the Triumph 22 is definitely worth a try.

Who should not buy the Saucony Triumph 22 ?

If you want a really versatile trainer that can also handle uptempo paces, the Triumph 22 is not for you.
If you have feet which are sensitive to heat, the Triumph 22 is not the shoe for you because it has a very warm upper.

Saucony Triumph 22 Introduction

Picture of Saucony Triumph 22

Most brands will use different midsole foams in their racing shoes and their max-cushioned trainers. For example, New Balance uses FuelCell in their racers, Fresh Foam X in their max-cushioned trainers. Adidas uses Lightstrike Pro in their racers, Boost in their max-cushioned trainer. ASICS has FF Turbo+ in their racers, FF Blast+ Eco in their max-cushioned trainer. Only Nike uses ZoomX in both their racers and their max-cushioned trainer.

Saucony uses PWRUN PB (PEBA) in their racers, and they used to use PWRRUN+ in the Triumph, their max-cushioned trainer. This year, PWRUN PB also makes an appearance in the Triumph 22 for the first time. This not only makes it more marketable but it also makes it better value for money because the Triumph 22 costs $160, the same price as last year and $10 cheaper than the Endorphin Speed 4 which also has PWRRUN PB in its midsole.

In the max-cushioned trainer category, the Triumph has been the king of versatility for many years now. While most max-cushioned trainers are only good for slow, easy runs, the Triumph’s energetic midsole made it capable of picking up the pace. Its TPU midsole also made it one of the most durable when it comes to cushioning retention.

My last pair of Triumphs was the 20, which had the same midsole as the 21st version. I enjoyed how much cushioning it had and how agile it felt at the same time. It was a really good long run shoe because it weighed under 10 ounces for a US9.

This year’s Triumph 22 comes in at 10.1 oz (286 g), a slight increase of 0.3 oz (8.5 g). It has the same 37 mm/27 mm stack heights but the heel, midfoot and forefoot are much wider. It has a clean sweep of changes including a new upper, midsole and outsole.

Saucony Triumph 22 First Impressions

Picture of Saucony Triumph 22

My first run in the 22 was a 28 kilometre long run starting off at an easy pace for the first 8 kilometres, followed by 20 kilometres at a steady pace. The ride felt much softer than I expected it to feel because PWRRUN PB is normally not so plush.

It felt much better during the easy portion of the long run because of how soft it felt underfoot. It reminded me more of the other slow, max-cushioned trainers like the Nimbus 26, More v4 and Glycerin 21 which are suited to easy runs only.

The upper felt luxurious but also really thick and warm. My feet felt like they were inside tiny ovens and by the end of the run, a lot of sweat had soaked into the upper.

Saucony Triumph 22 Upper

Picture of Saucony Triumph 22

As is the case with most max-cushioned trainers, the Triumph 22 upper is generously padded so it runs very warm and is more suited to cool climates than warm ones. It has a thick, engineered mesh upper which isn’t all that breathable so during long runs, my feet sweat a lot in it.

It has a thick tongue which is semi-gusseted and it doesn’t slide around during runs because it has wide wings to hold it in place. The collar is well-padded and foot lockdown is very good.

It fits true to size and it has an accommodating fit in the midfoot/forefoot. Runners with wide feet should be fine in the regular version but it also comes in a wide.

Saucony Triumph 22 Sole Unit

Picture of Saucony Triumph 22

This is definitely not the same PWRRUN PB foam that’s in the Endorphin Speed and Pro. It feels “fluffier” so your feet sink down into the midsole more. It also feels noticeably less energetic and less responsive than PWRRUN PB in the other shoes and PWRRUN+ that was in the Triumph 20/21.

If you’re into soft rides, you’ll enjoy the Triumph 22. It now has cushioning softness which is equivalent to the Nimbus 26 from ASICS or the On Cloudeclipse. It’s not quite as squishy as the New Balance 1080v13 but it’s still a very comfortable ride. It’s best suited to slow, easy or recovery runs which are 5:30 minutes per kilometre (8:52 per mile) or slower.

One of the other big differences between this version and previous ones is that the PWRRUN+ insole has been removed and swapped for a soft EVA insole, like in the Triumph 19. The change also makes the ride less bouncy and less energetic because your feet have to work through a spongy layer before they get to the responsive PEBA foam.

With 37 mm of stack height in the heel, the Triumph is a tall shoe but stability is excellent for a neutral trainer. This is due to the wider base, which is 10mm wider in the rearfoot/midfoot and 5 mm wider in the forefoot than the Triumph 21. Overpronators who need a little bit of stability will find that it offers enough support.

Picture of Saucony Triumph 22

There’s plenty of cushioning in the midsole of the Triumph 22 and you can definitely run a full marathon in it if you’re looking for a plush, flexible, non-plated option. Ride transitions are smooth and the gentle forefoot rocker makes it easy to roll through transitions.

The Triumph 22’s outsole is similar to its predecessor with the biggest change being that the transition groove in the centre now extends all the way from the heel to the end of the forefoot. The XT-900 outsole rubber is extremely tough so outsole durability is far higher than the average trainer. My pair is showing minimal outsole wear after 80 kilometres.

Saucony Triumph 22 Conclusions

Picture of Saucony Triumph 22

This year’s Triumph 22 has lost some of the Triumph essence. It feels much softer and isn’t as versatile as previous versions.

I think Saucony purposefully did this because the new Ride 17 with PWRRUN+ has become the cushioned, versatile trainer that you can use for every type of run. The Triumph is now your typical max-cushioned trainer which is only good for slow running.

The Triumph 22 is not a better shoe than the Triumph 21, neither is it worse. It depends on your use case: if you prefer versatility, you’ll prefer the 21, if you prefer plushness and comfort, the 22 is the better shoe. The 22 feels more luxurious because of its plusher ride but it has picked up weight.

The Triumph 22 doesn’t stand out from the crowd as much as in previous years. The Nimbus 26, More v4, Glycerin 21 and Bondi 8 are all max-cushioned trainers for slow running only, just like the Triumph 22. They are all very stable as well.

How does the Triumph 22 compare?

Brooks Glycerin 21
Saucony Triumph 22
Asics Gel Nimbus 26
Expert score
8
8
10
User score
Retail price
US$160
US$159.95
US$159.95
Weight
10 oz
10.5 oz
10.7 oz
Heel Drop
10 mm
10 mm
8 mm
Recommended for
Daily training
Daily training
Daily training
Cushioning type
balanced
balanced/plush
responsive/balanced
Cushioning amount
Highly cushioned
Highly cushioned
Highly cushioned
Flexibility
flexible
flexible
medium
Stability
very stable
very stable
some stability
Sizing
true to size
true to size
true to size

Why you can trust us

As editorial policy, we do not accept free samples from companies.
We purchased this pair of Saucony at Running Warehouse  with our own money.

This page contains affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases. Read more about our policy.
Lowest price:

$159

Saucony Triumph 22 price comparison

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Reviewed by Brandon

This review was written by Brandon Law on 27th May.
Brandon is a South African who lives and trains in Malaysia. He is a marathon runner who eats, sleeps and dreams running shoes. While most people wear shoes to run, he runs to wear shoes.

User feedback (0)

Lowest price:
$159

Where to buy

Best offers today in United States, all prices in USD

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