Asics GT 2000 General Info:

The GT 2000 is the newest in a long line of GT shoes from Asics. This season, Asics has decided to completely overhaul its most popular shoe, the GT 2170, from the ground up. I tested the all weather GT 2000 GTX earlier in 2012 and it quickly became my favorite trail running shoe. After that good experience I was certainly hot to trot when the new GT 2000 road shoe arrived at my doorstep.

Asics GT 2000 First Impression:

My test pair came to me in a striking colorway of black, silver, cobalt blue and lime green which was definitely an improvement over last year’s bland silver and blue GT 2170. Since I’d already run in the GT 2000 GTX, I was pretty much immediately familiar with the fit and ride of the GT 2000. With the exception of an ever so slightly narrow toe box the best description of the new GT series fit is average. But not in a bad way. This is a shoe that will work for a good number of runners. The GT 2000 was, however, noticeably lighter than its all-weather sister, the GT 2000 GTX.

Asics GT 2000 Sole Unit:

Asics has completely redone the GT series from the ground up and the midsole is now more supportive in the mid foot thanks to a newly designed shank that simply outperforms the earlier Space Trusstic design. This new design curves farther upward into the arch of the shoe and truly does a better job of reinforcing the arch. This is a feature that will definitely be appreciated by many over pronators.

Asics has also incorporated its new Dynamic Duomax medial post to help slow down the inward roll of the foot while keeping the ride smooth and reducing jarring when compared to the older Duomax foam. Since stability shoes are, apparently, not in vogue in these minimalistic times Asics has painted the Dynamic Duomax foam in a uniform pattern with the rest of the midsole. Admittedly, this paint scheme does make the shoe look more fluid minus the traditional grey piece of foam on the medial aspect of the shoe.

Asics legendary GEL cushioning system is still located in the heel and Asics claims it’s the largest GEL pad yet but to me, it looks considerably thinner than the GEL in the GT 2170. Asics SoLyte foam continues to provide the cushion and comprises the remainder of the 10 mm drop midsole.

On the outsole, Asics uses AHAR+(Asics High Abrasion Resistant) carbon rubber in the heel for durability and softer blown rubber up front to soak up the impact from the road. Guidance Line is also present and carves a channel underfoot to guide the foot from strike to toe off.

Asics GT 2000 Upper Unit:

The GT 2000 upper is designed identically to the GT 2000 GTx’s save for the Gore Tex material featured in the GTX. The six overlay patterns are identical and, rather prominent, in an effort to provide a secure mid foot and heel fit. Most overlays on the GT 2000 are sewn but the toe box gets a split welded overlay on the medial and lateral aspects. The Asics Tiger stripe also pulls double duty as a logo and overlay. The mesh used in the GT 2000 was fairly breathable and not nearly as hot as the GTX’s Gore Tex upper. The inner lining is a very plush ribbed material and it also houses Asics’ PHF(Personalized Heel Fit) memory foam. A thick OrthoLite foam style sock liner rounds out the upper.

Asics GT 2000 Opinion:

Again, I was pleased overall with the latest GT shoe from Asics. They rolled the dice and gave the shoe a total makeover while still capturing the hallmark feel of the GT series. The GT 2000 is a shoe that will work well for many runners needing some extra stability combined with good cushioning properties. In particular, I am impressed with the new mid foot shank as it delivers a good increase in torsional rigidity to the arch of the shoe.

However, the GT 2000 feels like it doesn’t excel at any one quality especially considering its new $120 price tag. I like a pretty firm heel and I found the GT 2000 just a touch too soft, especially on longer runs. The cushioning is certainly adequate and is now firmer and less bulky in the forefoot. I also found the 10 mm drop to be decidedly unremarkable and I could tell no difference from the GT 2170’s 11 mm design. As I said earlier, the toe box sizes in just a little narrower than I prefer but it did not cause me any issues. The forefoot is decently flexible but the GT 2000 doesn’t feel fast and is still heavier, more expensive and less stable than its closest competitor, the Mizuno Wave Inspire.

The outsole of the GT 2000 showed little wear during my testing which was mostly on asphalt with some treadmill runs sprinkled in. That’s a good thing and tells me that the GT 2000 shoe moves very much in accord with my foot.

Altogether I feel comfortable recommending the GT 2000 as a daily trainer for runners who need a little extra help in the stability department. If Asics could find a way to further lighten up this shoe, firm up the heel a bit and speed up its transition then it could certainly become my go to road shoe.

We thank the nice people at Asics for sending us a pair of GT 2000 to test. This did not influence the outcome of the review, written after running more than 50 miles in them.